Greg Klassan is a designer who has a unique approach to creating furniture. These fantastic looking tables by Klassan have been designed to look like rivers and lakes you’d see in any ordinary landscape. Klassan has delicately shaped each piece from fallen trees and then places beautiful glass with a tinge of blue in them.

Movie posters by Matt Needle.

More of them here: http://www.mattneedle.co.uk/

Salvador Dalí paints Laurence Olivier, 1955 - a picture from the past

Laurence Olivier, legendary star of stage and screen, died 25 years ago today. Salvador Dalí painted the actor dressed as Richard III for an image used to promote the film, which Olivier directed.

Salvador Dalí paints Laurence Olivier, 1955 - a picture from the past

Laurence Olivier, legendary star of stage and screen, died 25 years ago today. Salvador Dalí painted the actor dressed as Richard III for an image used to promote the film, which Olivier directed.

Each summer since 1970, the photographic world descends on Arles, France, for this annual celebration of their art.

1. Ruined Window, Seoul, 1956. Photograph: Youngsoo Han

2. Walé Asongwaka Takes Off. Photograph: Patrick Willocq

3. From the series Little Party Dress. Photograph: Delphine Schacher

4. Diver, Mostar, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 2012. Photograph: Adrien Pezennec

source: guardian

South Dakotan sculptor John Lopez creates life-sized scrap metal sculptures with a uniquely Western American twist. In his hands, old discarded farm equipment is recycled into sculptures of iconic creatures from the American West like a bison, a horse plowing a field, or a Texas Longhorn.

Lopez already had a career as a bronze sculptor, but after creating a family grave for his deceased aunt using scrap metal, he began creating recycled metal sculptures out of found or donated pieces of metal as well.

My favorite part about these pieces is the texture,” explains Lopez. “I just start grabbin’ stuff from the pile and welding it, in and if you weld enough of the same thing on over and over it creates this really cool texture that I’ve never seen in these kinds of pieces before. And I think that’s what draws people in.

source: boredpanda

Bagrad Badalian 

“There isn’t a guide on how to interpret or enjoy these pictures. It’s a work of art that leaves the audience on it’s own without much explanation. You got to let yourself go away from any theoretical conceptions and enter this universe with your senses as only background.”

Photography by Zhang Jingna (website)

I was born in Beijing. I moved to Singapore with my mother when I was 8 and spent most of my teenage years there. I studied fashion design and was a national team air rifle shooter for Singapore for 6 years before I went full-time with photography.

I started with shooting people in the beginning, and I guess because I studied fashion, I was led naturally into fashion and beauty for magazines and commercial work.

Right now I’m focused full-time on my personal project “Motherland Chronicles.”

It’s an exploration of sort. An attempt at putting together elements and themes I’ve loved since I was a child. It has a bit of a don’t-want-to-forget-my-childhood-dreams sort of thing going on; since I’ve been working for almost 7 years now, I don’t want to lose track of who I am, but it’s easy to as you grow and do too much commercial stuff, you know? So it goes back a lot more to my creative roots, more illustrative and painterly, like artworks that inspired me to create. Loosely linked together with hints of dark fantasy.

interview source

Patricia Derks collects images and translates them in her own styl with a special way of using colors. 

I Found The Silence by Martin Stranka
Martin Stranka is a self-taught professional photographer, born on 13 April, 1984 in the Czech Republic. Martin’s biography says he has a ‘distinctive vision of photography that is etched as a unique space located in a balance of serenity, while his sophisticated and rewarding images exist in that narrow space of a few seconds between dreaming and awakening.’
What draws you to people photography?It is true that there is always a person standing alone in my photographs. Today, we are constantly assigned to different groups, social networking, classes, etc. Man is constantly pushed to be part of a group. Even so, we spend 24 hours per day, 7 days a week with ourselves.All photos are displayed as a sort of personal communication process and everyone who sees the photo can find himself on the other hand. Photos are somehow so personal and yet so universal.
Could you talk us through how you took the shot ‘I found the silence’?This photo was unbelievably difficult to take. So many wood pieces were flying in the air thanks to people around us throwing it, and the fans. I had to edit it in Photoshop later as well. The photo was taken on my favourite forgotten road near Prague.Your work seems very emotionally fuelled. What is your aim with photography?I never think about the aim of my photographs. It is something automatic and something that grows in me. For me, photography is kind of my own diary which shows parts and moments of my life.

I Found The Silence by Martin Stranka

Martin Stranka is a self-taught professional photographer, born on 13 April, 1984 in the Czech Republic. Martin’s biography says he has a ‘distinctive vision of photography that is etched as a unique space located in a balance of serenity, while his sophisticated and rewarding images exist in that narrow space of a few seconds between dreaming and awakening.’

What draws you to people photography?
It is true that there is always a person standing alone in my photographs. Today, we are constantly assigned to different groups, social networking, classes, etc. Man is constantly pushed to be part of a group. Even so, we spend 24 hours per day, 7 days a week with ourselves.

All photos are displayed as a sort of personal communication process and everyone who sees the photo can find himself on the other hand. Photos are somehow so personal and yet so universal.

Could you talk us through how you took the shot ‘I found the silence’?
This photo was unbelievably difficult to take. So many wood pieces were flying in the air thanks to people around us throwing it, and the fans. I had to edit it in Photoshop later as well. The photo was taken on my favourite forgotten road near Prague.

Your work seems very emotionally fuelled. What is your aim with photography?
I never think about the aim of my photographs. It is something automatic and something that grows in me. For me, photography is kind of my own diary which shows parts and moments of my life.

Subversion by Miriam Sweeney 
"Subversion’ was driven by the need to articulate a journey from one level of reality to another – the unknown. A dark horse..a leap of faith…"

Subversion by Miriam Sweeney 

"Subversion’ was driven by the need to articulate a journey from one level of reality to another – the unknown. A dark horse..a leap of faith…"